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Installation Diagrams for CallerID.com Products

Typical installations are shown for Serial Port and Ethernet Link Whozz Calling? units with Telephone System Switches installed and without Telephone System Switches simply using standard single line, 2-line, or 4-line telephones.

Serial Port Whozz Calling? with Telephone Switch

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In order to capture Caller ID, it is required that the "Whozz Calling?" unit be connected to the main incoming lines before they terminate into a telephone system switch. Most likely, professional telephony tools and connecters will be needed for the installation. If you are not exceedingly familiar with your phone system wiring, contact a telephone technician specializing in internal building wiring. Although the unit may have both input and output telephone line ports, it is recommended that the unit be connected in parallel with phone lines.

The "Whozz Calling?" unit is usually placed next to the host computer. The EL Popup software from CallerID.com allows you to use any computer as the host. Many other software applications require that the host computer be your network server. The computer connection uses a straight DB9 M-F serial cable. Alternatively, a "USB-to-Serial Port Adapter Cable" along with software drivers can be used.

Serial Port Whozz Calling? without Telephone Switch

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If your company simply uses standard single line, 2-line, or 4-line phones, the “Whozz Calling?” unit is usually placed next to the host computer. The EL Popup software from CallerID.com allows you to use any computer as the host. Many other software applications require that the host computer be your network server.

Phone connections can be accomplished using the appropriate modular adaptors. Although the unit may have both input and output telephone line ports, it is recommended that the unit be connected in parallel with phone lines.

The computer connection uses a straight DB9 M-F serial cable. Alternatively, a “USB-to-Serial Port Adapter Cable” along with software drivers can be used.

Ethernet Link Whozz Calling? with Telephone Switch

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If your company uses a telephone system switch, the unit would be installed similar to this diagram. In order to capture Caller ID, it is required that the “Whozz Calling?” unit be connected to the main incoming lines.

Most likely, professional telephony tools and connecters will be needed for the installation. If you are not exceedingly familiar with your phone system wiring, contact a telephone technician specializing in internal building wiring. Although the unit may have both input and output telephone line ports, it is recommended that the unit be connected in parallel with phone lines.

The Ethernet cable can be connected to either the local area network switch or an Ethernet wall jack connected to the network switch.

Ethernet Link Whozz Calling? without Telephone Switch

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If your company simply uses standard single line, 2-line, or 4-line phones, the “Whozz Calling?” unit can be placed in any convenient location in which all the phone lines of interest and an Ethernet connection are present.

Connections can be accomplished using the appropriate modular adaptors. Although the unit may have both input and output telephone line ports, it is recommended that the unit be connected in parallel with phone lines.

The Ethernet cable can be connected to either the local area network switch or an Ethernet wall jack connected to the network switch.

Vertex with Simple Hosted VoIP Environment

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A typical network architecture is shown with a Vertex unit connected. If a separate gateway router and network switch is not present, most likely you will need to install a network switch. In order to see all the inbound and outbound VoIP traffic, the Vertex must be connected between the gateway router and the network switch. The output of the Vertex is connected to a standard port on the network switch or the serial port can be used. All green lines indicate new connections.

Vertex with Hosted VoIP and Auxiliary Switch

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If an auxiliary network switch is used for the phone connections, we recommend placing the Vertex between it and the main switch. Removing the original connection allows all VoIP traffic to flow through the Vertex “VoIP Bridge Ports”. The Vertex “Management Port” can be connected to any switch on the network. Depending on your application software, the data output will be delivered via the Management Port connection or the serial port. All green lines above indicate new connections.

Vertex with Hosted Separate VoIP and Data Networks

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This architecture is primarily seen with Hosted VoIP, but a Managed VoIP system may also use a separate VoIP and Data Network.  The key to this, and any other Vertex installation, is to route the network cable carrying all VoIP traffic through the two Vertex monitoring ports.  The Vertex “Data Out” port connects to the data network switch.

In the Vertex Configuration Tool (VCT), the “SIP Gateway MAC” will need to be specified.  When the Vertex is connected similar to the diagram, the SIP Gateway MAC entered will be the MAC address of the VoIP gateway in the provider’s interface.

Vertex with Managed VoIP and SIP Gateway

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Managed VoIP service employs a SIP server device on site to process calls.  Some SIP servers also provide the Gateway for all external VoIP traffic.  The SIP server/Gateway can be an Asterisk PC or Telephone switch card fed with a SIP Trunk or ISDN PRI circuit.  

Any on-site Asterisk switch deployed is technically a Managed VoIP system.  But, for Asterisk switches using the Data Gateway to route external VoIP traffic, refer to the Hosted VoIP diagram for connections.  Specifically, the Vertex would be placed between the Data Gateway Router and the Network Switch.