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How It Works

Select the section pertaining to the device that you are interestested in. Vertex VoIP devices work differently based on your network architecture.

Serial Devices

Many small businesses have a phone system whereby analog incoming phone lines are switched to proprietary extension phones via a phone switch (sometimes referred to as a Phone System Switch, Key Switch or PBX). If no phone switch is present and simple multi-line phones are used, the connections to a Whozz Calling? Caller ID unit are virtually identical.
Typical Business Telephone System
HowItWorksSerialPhones.png

When a LAN is employed, the network switch or router connects all the workstations. For clarity, we have identified one computer connected to the LAN as a "host computer" for Caller ID collection and delivery. This computer could be the file server or any other workstation.

Business Telephone System with Local Area Network
HowItWorksSerialNetwork.png

When a phone switch is present, the Whozz Calling? unit would be connected to the incoming lines before they terminate at the phone switch. A telephone technician would simply connect a set of lines in parallel and run them to the Caller ID unit located next to the host computer. The data connection is made with the supplied RS232 serial cable. The host computer collects the Caller ID information and sends it over the network to the rest of the workstations.

Adding Caller ID Hardware to Existing Configuration
HowItWorksSerialAll.png

Note that the Whozz Calling? unit will not operate properly when connected to the extension lines from a phone switch. Whozz Calling? devices only capture analog Caller ID. Telephone switches do not pass analog Caller ID to extension lines. Even Caller ID capable phone switches do not pass analog Caller ID; instead, they transmit proprietary digital Caller ID to the extension phones.

Since the Whozz Calling? is connected in parallel with the incoming phone lines, it acts as a listening device for Caller ID and other phone call information. The phone switch rings the extension phones ring in the office and the Caller ID is captured by the unit just after the first ring. The Whozz Calling? immediately sends data to the host computer, which in turn, relays it all other workstations on the LAN. Any computer loaded with Caller ID software picks up this information and displays it.

Animated Data Delivery Representation

Ethernet Link Devices

Many small businesses have a phone system whereby analog incoming phone lines are switched to proprietary extension phones via a phone switch (sometimes referred to as a Phone System Switch, Key Switch or PBX). If no phone switch is present and simple multi-line phones are used, the connections to a Whozz Calling? Caller ID unit are virtually identical.

  Typical Business Telephone System
HowItWorksEthernetPhones.png

The network switch or router connects all the computers.

Business Telephone System with Local Area Network
HowItWorksEthernetNetwork.png

When a phone switch is present, the Whozz Calling? unit would be connected to the incoming lines before they terminate at the phone switch. A telephone technician would simply connect a parallel set of phone lines to the Caller ID unit. The Whozz Calling? connects to the local area network with a standard Ethernet cable.

Adding Caller ID Hardware to Existing Configuration
HowItWorksEthernetAll.png

Note that the Whozz Calling? unit will not operate properly when connected to the extension lines from a phone switch. Whozz Calling? devices only capture analog Caller ID. Telephone switches do not pass analog Caller ID to extension lines. Even Caller ID capable phone switches do not pass analog Caller ID; instead, they transmit proprietary digital Caller ID to the extension phones.

Since the Whozz Calling? is connected in parallel with the incoming phone lines, it acts as a listening device for Caller ID and other phone call information. The phone switch rings the extension phones ring in the office and the Caller ID is captured by the unit just after the first ring. The Whozz Calling? immediately sends data to all the computers attached to the local area network. Any computer loaded with Caller ID software picks up this information and displays it.

Animated Data Delivery Representation

Vertex with Simple Hosted VoIP

The local network is connected to the Internet with a gateway router. A network switch connects multiple computers to the gateway and to each other. While some network architectures use one device working as both a gateway and switch, this diagram depicts two separate devices performing these individual functions.

SimpleHosted1.png

Hosted VoIP service allows the customer to simply connect VoIP phones to their Local Area Network (LAN). The service provider configures the communication parameters and manages all voice traffic from their remote location.

SimpleHosted2.png

The Vertex unit is placed between the Gateway Router and Network switch. The Vertex output port is connected to the network switch for programming purposes. Although internet traffic passes through the Vertex, all packets are undisturbed. The sniffer circuit simply inspects VoIP packets to see the call data transmitted.This architecture eliminates any possible Internet disruption due to Vertex failure.

SimpleHosted3.png

Output from the Vertex is via Ethernet or RS232 transmitted in the standard CallerID.com format. Any software previously designed to work with Whozz Calling? analog devices will be compatible.

Vertex with Separate VoIP & Data Networks

The local network is connected to the Internet with a gateway router. A network switch connects multiple computers to the gateway and to each other. While some network architectures use one device working as both a gateway and switch, this diagram depicts two separate devices performing these individual functions.

SeparateVoIPandData1.png

For Architectures employing separate Voice and Data networks, a separate switch connects all VoIP phones and media devices. This scheme helps provide quality of service for voice and video transmissions.

SeparateVoIPandData2.png

The Vertex unit is placed between the VoIP gateway and the VoIP network switch.  The Vertex output port is connected to the Data network for programming purposes. All packets that pass through the Vertex go undisturbed. A sniffer circuit simply inspects VoIP packets to see the transmitted call data. This architecture eliminates any possible disruption due to Vertex failure.

SeparateVoIPandData3.png

Output from the Vertex is via Ethernet or RS232 and transmitted in the standard CallerID.com format. Any software previously designed to work with Whozz Calling? Analog devices will be compatible.

Vertex with Managed VoIP and SIP Gateways

The local network is connected to the Internet with a gateway router. A network switch connects multiple computers to the gateway and to each other. While some network architectures use one device working as both a gateway and switch, this diagram depicts two separate devices performing these individual functions.

ManagedwithSIPGateway1.png

Managed VoIP service employs a SIP server device on site to process calls.  Some SIP servers also provide the Gateway for all external VoIP traffic.  The SIP server/Gateway can be an Asterisk PC or Telephone switch card fed with a SIP Trunk or ISDN PRI circuit. 

ManagedwithSIPGateway2.png

The Vertex is placed between the SIP server and the network switch. The Vertex output port is connected to the network switch for programming purposes.

ManagedwithSIPGateway3.png

Output from the Vertex is via Ethernet or RS232 and transmitted in the standard CallerID.com format. Any software previously designed to work with Whozz Calling? Analog devices will be compatible.