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How it Works

Serial Devices

Many small businesses have a phone system whereby analog incoming phone lines are switched to proprietary extension phones via a phone switch (sometimes referred to as a Phone System Switch, Key Switch or PBX). If no phone switch is present and simple multi-line phones are used, the connections to a Whozz Calling? Caller ID unit are virtually identical.

Typical Business Telephone System
HowItWorksSerialPhones.png

When a LAN is employed, the network switch or router connects all the workstations. For clarity, we have identified one computer connected to the LAN as a "host computer" for Caller ID collection and delivery. This computer could be the file server or any other workstation.

Business Telephone System with Local Area Network
HowItWorksSerialNetwork.png

When a phone switch is present, the Whozz Calling? unit would be connected to the incoming lines before they terminate at the phone switch. A telephone technician would simply connect a set of lines in parallel and run them to the Caller ID unit located next to the host computer. The data connection is made with the supplied RS232 serial cable. The host computer collects the Caller ID information and sends it over the network to the rest of the workstations.

Adding Caller ID Hardware to Existing Configuration
HowItWorksSerialAll.png

Note that the Whozz Calling? unit will not operate properly when connected to the extension lines from a phone switch. Whozz Calling? devices only capture analog Caller ID. Telephone switches do not pass analog Caller ID to extension lines. Even Caller ID capable phone switches do not pass analog Caller ID; instead, they transmit proprietary digital Caller ID to the extension phones.

Since the Whozz Calling? is connected in parallel with the incoming phone lines, it acts as a listening device for Caller ID and other phone call information. The phone switch rings the extension phones ring in the office and the Caller ID is captured by the unit just after the first ring. The Whozz Calling? immediately sends data to the host computer, which in turn, relays it all other workstations on the LAN. Any computer loaded with Caller ID software picks up this information and displays it.

Animated Data Delivery Representation

Ethernet Link Devices

Many small businesses have a phone system whereby analog incoming phone lines are switched to proprietary extension phones via a phone switch (sometimes referred to as a Phone System Switch, Key Switch or PBX). If no phone switch is present and simple multi-line phones are used, the connections to a Whozz Calling? Caller ID unit are virtually identical.

Typical Business Telephone System
HowItWorksEthernetPhones.png

The network switch or router connects all the computers.

Business Telephone System with Local Area Network
HowItWorksEthernetNetwork.png

When a phone switch is present, the Whozz Calling? unit would be connected to the incoming lines before they terminate at the phone switch. A telephone technician would simply connect a parallel set of phone lines to the Caller ID unit. The Whozz Calling? connects to the local area network with a standard Ethernet cable.

Adding Caller ID Hardware to Existing Configuration
HowItWorksEthernetAll.png

Note that the Whozz Calling? unit will not operate properly when connected to the extension lines from a phone switch. Whozz Calling? devices only capture analog Caller ID. Telephone switches do not pass analog Caller ID to extension lines. Even Caller ID capable phone switches do not pass analog Caller ID; instead, they transmit proprietary digital Caller ID to the extension phones.

Since the Whozz Calling? is connected in parallel with the incoming phone lines, it acts as a listening device for Caller ID and other phone call information. The phone switch rings the extension phones ring in the office and the Caller ID is captured by the unit just after the first ring. The Whozz Calling? immediately sends data to all the computers attached to the local area network. Any computer loaded with Caller ID software picks up this information and displays it.

Animated Data Delivery Representation